welcome to the honoré growers guild

the honoré growers guild is formed of the farmers, millers, bakers and churches that grow, mill, bake and serve communion bread made from flour grown from ancient strains of wheat. each member of the guild plays a vital part in restoring the ancient circle of providing life-giving bread to all. the bread on the altar symbolizes our commitment to care for the earth and its people.

mission

the honoré growers guild’s mission is to create awareness, offer education and build connections to recreate agricultural communities that have existed for thousands of years by restoring the harmonious interdependence between the farmer, the miller, the baker and the church.

vision

the honoré growers guild’s envisions regional grain economies (farmer, miller, baker and church-goer), enabling every altar to sustainably and intentionally source their communion bread or wafers. through the aggregation of our sustainability data, we can better encourage others to follow our lead.

 

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interested in the relationship between food, farming and faith?
check out this publication by our founder and director, elizabeth.

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what the honoré growers guild can do for you

expertise 

the honoré growers guild provides unique expertise and the knowledge necessary to take farmers and churches through the entire process of supplying grain for communion bread, including on-site consultations, soil prep, seed selection, resources for planning community planting and harvest days and personalized communion bread recipes.

form connections in your community

being part of the guild creates community by interlinking churches, farmers, millers and bakers making interdependent local grain economies. learn how to host community planting and harvest days.

be part of a national movement

join a national movement that is improving our food system and thereby addressing climate change by fostering interdependent and sustainable local grain economies.

marketing and promotion outreach

the honoré growers guild provides resources for churches, newsletters  and blogs, whether farmer, miller, baker, or church, your role in the mission will be recognized nationally.

 

 

 

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“Eating with the fullest pleasure – pleasure, that is, that does not depend on ignorance – is perhaps the profoundest enactment of our connection with the world. In this pleasure we experience and celebrate our dependence and our gratitude, for we are living from mystery, from creatures we did not make and powers we cannot comprehend.”  Wendell Berry (1934 -)

join the honoré growers guild as a church csa member

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When you join our CSA (community supported agriculture) you are part of a larger movement to restore the vitality to communion bread. Freshly stone milled flour will be delivered four times a year directly to your church. Heirloom, stone milled flour is very digestible so people with gluten sensitivity (not celiac however) find they can once again enjoy bread. This flour is like nothing you’ve tasted, it’s slightly sweet, nutty and truly a superior flour to commercial flour.

We pray over each bag of flour and include a thought-provoking seasonal meditation written by members of our CSA.

We grow our organic heirloom wheat at three locations: The Bishop's Ranch and at Preston Farm and Winery, a biodynamic farm. Both farms are in Healdsburg, CA. We also grow wheat with The Mendocino Grain Project in Ukiah.

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our certification and farming practices

Our farm practices express our values in action. Our intention is to care for the soil, water, and complete ecosystem with all of our work. "Healthy soil has the miraculous ability to sequester carbon. And it’s not just carbon storage, healthy soil leads to: clean water, nutritious food, drought resistance, and restored habitats." Farming with the ecological practices makes our work of growing food an act of Land Stewardship. 

Through our Honoré Growers Guild we certify:

  • organic seed

  • non-proprietary seed

  • stone-milled flour

  • Locally grown

  • farmed with little or no irrigation

  • use of sustainable farming practices: low-till, crop rotation, cover cropping

  • land, seed and flour are blessed

  • a percentage of the grain is intentionally hand-planted and hand-harvested by community volunteers

 

Key practices for Honoré Farm and Mill 

  • organic seed
  • non-proprietary seed
  • stone-milled flour
  • locally grown
  • farmed with little or no irrigation
  • use of sustainable farming practices: low-till, crop rotation, cover cropping
  • land, seed and flour are blessed
  • a percentage of the grain is intentionally hand-planted and hand-harvested by community volunteers
  • measuring and tracking of carbon sequestration

Our practices ensure soil vitality delivering healthy plants and nutritious food. We know the best tasting and healthiest food comes from healthy soil and we work hard to honor this connection in our dedication to ecological farming. 

“Healthy soil, healthy food, healthy people” - J.I. Rodale

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learn how to host community planting and harvest days

honore farm & mill celebrates the ancient ritual of community planting and harvest days to reconnect our community with the land and with each other.

in england, harvest days like ours are also called lammas day, which literally means "loaf-mass."  lammas comes from the ancient celtic festival which marked the first harvest. ceremonially the first sheaf of wheat was threshed, milled and baked into bread.  the bread was offered to ceres, the goddess of agriculture, in recognition for the land providing their food. later, christians saw the wisdom of giving thanks for food that comes from god's earth and adopted this practice, giving thanks to god for the "first fruits" of the field.

we share bread baked from the harvest, feeling the energy of the sun in our mouths, knowing every hand that touched those seeds and milled the flour.

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bread baking classes and workshops

bread baking practicum

This workshop integrates meaningful spiritual reflection with culinary lessons.  As we discuss the ingredients, tools, and processes that create bread and flour, we are never far from the sacramental reality that these are the outward and visible signs of inward and spiritual truth.

In the practicum, we’ll examine more closely the differences between commercial flour and flour made from heirloom grains. We’ll also work on adjusting your recipes for whole grains. Everyone will learn to produce incredibly healthy and flavorful communion bread with low-tech equipment – baked with our freshly milled, heirloom whole wheat flour.

We’ll conclude by sharing our labor, bread warm from the oven – tasting the work of our companionship.  

If you'd like to offer this workshop at your church or synagogue please fill out the form below.

farm to altar table

“It’s a workshop rich with specific information and inspiration relevant to your personal life as well as to your community and beyond.” Coreen Walsh, Farm and Garden Director – Camp Stevens Episcopal Camp and Conference Center.

The Farm to Altar Table Workshop is appropriate for congregational forums and interfaith gatherings.

This workshop makes the connection between the bread on the altar table to what arises from the soil; linking farmers, farm practices and food-production practices to the communion bread we eat. We'll move from the personal and practical to the communal and spiritual.  Personally and practically speaking we'll learn about landrace and modern wheats, their nutrition value and why the staff of life is making some people sick (gluten issues). Communally and spiritually we'll look at the impact of farming conventional wheat on the environment and some of the social and historical relationships between agriculture and the church.  Spiritually, we'll discuss why Jesus asked us to remember him by sharing bread and what does that mean for our lives?

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how to join

do you own land and want to learn to grow wheat?

do you own a stone mill and want to grind wheat?

are you a baker or church that wants to bake communion bread with honoré flour?

 One of honoré's farmers, Jesus, from preston farm & winery, healdsburg, california

One of honoré's farmers, Jesus, from preston farm & winery, healdsburg, california

 honoré's miller, doug mosel of the mendecino grain project, ukaih, california

honoré's miller, doug mosel of the mendecino grain project, ukaih, california

 the beloved reverend stefani schatz+ celebrating eucharist at the diocese of california clergy conference, 2016

the beloved reverend stefani schatz+ celebrating eucharist at the diocese of california clergy conference, 2016

Would you like to join the Honoré Growers Guild? We are looking for five new farms and partners excited to join us in our mission of enabling all Episcopal altars to source sustainable flour for communion bread.

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episcopal general convention

 Presiding Bishop Michael Curry celebrating Eucharist with bread baked with Honoré flour at Grace Cathedral in San Francisco

Presiding Bishop Michael Curry celebrating Eucharist with bread baked with Honoré flour at Grace Cathedral in San Francisco

The Reverend Thomas Brackett (Church Planting and Redevelopment) has been a longtime friend, colleague, and advocate to Honoré Farm & Mill

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The Reverend Amber Carswell from Trinity Cathedral in Little Rock

A group of young adults from Black Lives Matter enjoying the delicious taste of whole wheat bread made with Honoré flour

The Reverend Stephanie Spellers Canon to the Presiding Bishop for Evangelism and Reconciliation.
When you eat this bread, what do you remember?
“I remember sitting at Grandma’s table, eating cobbler and feeling loved.”

In 2015, Honoré Farm & Mill provided the flour for communion bread at the Episcopal General Convention in Salt Lake City, utah.

Keep your eye out for Honoré Farm & Mill at the 2018 Episcopal General Convention in Austin, Texas.

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